LED Information

 

LED History

ledHistory

Light-emitting diode is an electric component that emits light when connected to direct current. It works on electroluminescent principle and can emit light in visible specter as well as in infrared and ultraviolet. They have characteristically low energy consumption, small size, longer lifetime and faster switching than incandescence lamps and because of that, they have a wide palette of applicability.

LED lighting is used as a replacement for incandescent and neon lights, in large RGB screen displays, in semaphores and other visual signals, in calculators, watches and in flashlights. Infrared LEDs are used in units for remote control in TVs, DVDs and other places that need wireless control.

Advantages of Light emitting diodes are that they emit more light per watt that incandescent lamps, they are much smaller, their on/off time is much shorter than of the other types of electric light sources (they are quick), their lifetime is much longer and they are much more difficult to damage.   (History of Lighting)

 

UL and Energy Star or DLC Certified

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The DesignLights Consortium® promotes quality, performance and energy efficient commercial sector lighting solutions through collaboration among its federal, regional, state, utility, and energy efficiency program members, luminaire manufacturers, lighting designers, and other industry stakeholders throughout the US and Canada. DLC Certified products are eligible for local and federal rebates and incentives. We have many retrofit systems, fixtures, and kits that are DLC approved in various categories of luminaires. Please click the link below to go to the QPL (DLC’s Qualified Products List) then hit search to see a complete list of what retrofits and fixtures are certified.

Rapidly evolving thinking about energy efficiency and public safety – along with exciting technological advances – is driving the evolution of the lighting industry, providing greater opportunities and growing challenges. Leverage UL’s safety science expertise, worldwide presence, and active involvement in the lighting industry to gain accelerated access to the global marketplace and to meet regulatory requirements. Our Solstice® LED Modules are UL Listed along with several LED fixtures and retrofits. Click the link below to search UL Certifications for the US and Canada. Enter “Global Tech LED” in the company field and hit search.

(Global Tech LED)

 

LED Color Temperature

LED Color Chart

Color temperature is a way to describe the light appearance provided by a light bulb (lamp). It is measured in degrees of Kelvin (K) on a scale from 1,000 to 10,000. Typically, commercial and residential lighting application Kelvin temperatures fall somewhere on a scale from 2000K to 6500K. A light bulb’s (lamp’s) color temperature lets us know what the look and feel of the light produced will be. For example, if you heat up a metal object, the object appears to glow. Depending on the Kelvin temperature that the metal object is being heated at, the glow will be various colors, such as orange, yellow or blue. The color temperature of light bulbs (lamps) is meant to replicate the Kelvin temperature of the metal object.

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                                                            (© Westinghouse Lighting)

  • At the lower end of the scale, from 2000K to 3000K, the light produced is called “warm white” and ranges from orange to yellow-white in appearance.
  • Color temperatures between 3100K and 4500K are referred to as “cool white” or “bright white.” Light bulbs (lamps) within this range will emit a more neutral white light and may even have a slightly blue tint.
  • Above 4500K brings us into the “daylight” color temperature of light. Light bulbs (lamps) with color temperatures of 4500K and above will give off a blue-white light that mimics daylight.  (© Westinghouse Lighting)

 

LED vs. Fluorescent

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On average, an incandescent bulb may last around 1000 hours, while a fluorescent (CFL) bulb producing the same amount of light (in Lumens) may last around 8,000 hours, and an equivalent LED bulb may last around 25,000 hours. Because of their efficiency, LED’s are generally more costly, but the energy saved on your electric bill pays off when compared to incandescent bulbs.

led-lighting-comparison-chart

When looking at a 60-Watt incandescent bulb, the price of running that single bulb for 20 years (based on 6 hours per day) is $360. The price of running a 60-Watt LED equivalent for the same amount of time is only $72. So while an incandescent might only be around $1.00/bulb in comparison to $10.00/bulb for the LED, think about how much you would save by replacing every bulb in your house!

The 20-year savings on replacing a single candescent bulb with an LED would be $288, but when you multiply that by (as example) 20 light bulbs in your home, you’re saving $5760 in the long run. If you have even more, lets say (as example) 40 light bulbs in your home, you’re saving $11,520 over 20 years. That’s $576 dollars a year!  (EarthLED.com)